How Do You Get Scalp Psoriasis?

How Do You Get Scalp Psoriasis?

How Do You Get Scalp Psoriasis?


Scalp psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent autoimmune condition that causes red, scaly patches on the scalp. It can also cause itching, burning, and hair loss. Scalp psoriasis affects about 7 million Americans and can occur at any age. There is no cure for scalp psoriasis, but there are treatments that can help manage the symptoms.


There are several theories about what causes scalp psoriasis, but the exact cause is unknown. However, it is believed to be related to an overactive immune system. Scalp psoriasis is also thought to be genetic, meaning it can run in families.


There are several risk factors for developing scalp psoriasis, including:


• Family history of psoriasis


• Stress


• Smoking


• Certain medical conditions, such as HIV/AIDS, psoriatic arthritis, and diabetes


If you have scalp psoriasis, you may notice one or more of the following symptoms:


• Red, scaly patches on the scalp


• itching


• Burning sensation on the scalp


• Hair loss


• Crusting of the scalp


If you think you might have scalp psoriasis, see your healthcare provider for an evaluation. There is no one test that can diagnose scalp psoriasis. Your healthcare provider will ask about your medical history and perform a physical examination. He or she may also recommend laboratory tests or a biopsy to rule out other conditions.


Once a diagnosis of scalp psoriasis is made, your healthcare provider will develop a treatment plan that is right for you. Treatment for scalp psoriasis often includes medicated shampoos or creams, light therapy, or oral medications. In some cases, a combination of treatments may be recommended. With treatment, most people with scalp psoriasis can control their symptoms and live normal lives. There are a few ways that you can get scalp psoriasis. The first way is by having a family member with the condition. If one of your parents or grandparents has scalp psoriasis, you're more likely to get it too.


The second way you can get scalp psoriasis is by having another type of psoriasis. If you have plaque psoriasis on your body, you're more likely to develop scalp psoriasis as well.


The last way you can get scalp psoriasis is by having a weakened immune system. If you have HIV/AIDS, take certain medications (like steroids), or have undergone a organ transplant, you're at a higher risk for developing scalp psoriasis.


If you think you might have scalp psoriasis, it's important to see a doctor or dermatologist. They can look at your scalp and make a diagnosis. There is no one-size-fits-all treatment for scalp psoriasis, but there are a number of options available that can help relieve your symptoms.

It's not clear what causes scalp psoriasis, but it's believed to be related to an overactive immune system.


Scalp psoriasis may be hereditary, meaning it can run in families. If you have scalp psoriasis, you may also have joint problems, such as psoriatic arthritis.


There's no cure for scalp psoriasis, but there are treatments that can help relieve the symptoms.

Symptoms


Scalp psoriasis symptoms can include:

  • raised, scaly patches of skin
  • itching
  • redness
  • hair loss

Treatments


Topical treatments, such as corticosteroids, coal tar, or calcipotriene (a vitamin D derivative), may be used to treat scalp psoriasis. These are available as shampoos, creams, gels, or ointments.


phototherapy, which involves exposing the skin to Ultraviolet A (UVA) or B (UVB) light, is another treatment option. This can be done in a doctor's office or at home with a special UVB lamp.


In some cases, oral or injected drugs may be prescribed to treat scalp psoriasis. These include drugs that affect the immune system, such as methotrexate or cyclosporine.

Prevention


There's no way to prevent scalp psoriasis, but there are things you can do to reduce your risk of flare-ups. These include:

  • shampooing regularly and using a mild shampoo
  • avoiding harsh chemicals or treatments on your hair
  • avoiding triggers that can cause a flare-up, such as stress or cold weather




Sources: American Academy of Dermatology , Mayo Clinic .

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